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20121216
20121216
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said they knew they were getting words of encouragement from as far away places as south america and south africa. so those were some of the positive things that happened, but there was a lot of emotion there in that classroom today. anderson? >> there's emotion really everywhere in this town. i've had people come up to me and say, i have no more tears left. and yet we see people crying all the time. it's hard not to when you're here. president obama's arrival, of course, reminds us of the many difficult roles that a president plays in our national life. i want to bring in our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin, who's joining me here right now. the president, we believe, is already inside the high school, yes? >> yes, he's grieving and comforting families who have lost loved ones. >> and the service is to start at 7:00. he'll also be speaking there. >> he'll be speaking, and i'm told that the president has himself been working on these remarks. he's taken it personally and been preparing them, even on his way up here, anderson. told that the remarks will speak to the
the united states in compassing all of central america, canada, perhaps south america. this is what people think is going to happen. how do you do with the situation? it's not a coincidence that william walker supports slavery. his ideas to bring african slaves into these areas geared some people talk about perhaps we shouldn't say essential americans themselves. so it's a strange and unusual situation, the filibustering exist very uneasily with the u.s.-mexico war. but by no means at the close of the u.s.-mexican war stop people from territory. i think the ease or seeming ease with which the u.s. tech half of mexico's territory broadens expansionists to say it said was that easy to get that much of mexico, we can get central america no problem. at the very back. >> two questions are forming in my mind. [inaudible] first question has to do with the immigrants coming to the united states during the 1840s. did they have an opinion or observation about the war, and how did it affect their immigration to u.s. society? second question is core of montgomery research reporting affect the national
 the south, and i think it is an important detail to focus on because those who don't know the history of the involvement tend to dismiss them as they sometimes use america's mercenaries because we paid for a lot of the military hardware and logistics and the troops also tend to focus the various thais engaged in black-market schemes but the behind it is that they were fighting and they were dying for years thailand was sort of carrying out the war they saw as the war in south vietnam. so the casualties are something that we should keep in mind. >> professor ruth, thai-u.s. relations. thai has been an ally for a lon time yet participated in the and world war ii. >> absolutely. date back to the famous example of offering abraham lincoln war for the troubles of the american civil war. the 20th thais were always close u.s. allies and this was intensified it was disrupted war. but then as the cold war pretty
christmas eve subjective access to and a lot of people feel very strong about that. >> i live in the south, ground zero for the nra but further to the right of gun owners of america. it's a part of our culture. i was raised in a household with guns. my mother later on when she was a widow, had guns. my father was my first hero. and i describe in the piece, i think, for the first time publicly, how he was murdered. and it was not an ak-47. it was not a bushmaster. it was a 22, four bullets to the head. 20 years later, my brother krystofer, we're just a few months apart in age, he was murdered in a remarkably similar fashion. both of them were gun owners. neither of them had an opportunity to defend themselves. they were ambushed. so as a growing person and joining the marine corp, we were taught, everything about weaponry there is. i left the marine corp and have owned a gun nearly every day since. one, because i was a single mother. and with small children in a home and just me and not living in the most desirable neighborhood, i slept near the front door. i was raised in east st. louis an
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4